Caribou Wilderness

Last weekends backpacking trip came together on short notice. It started with me asking my faithful trail mate, my brother, if he wanted to go for a one night trip into the woods the coming weekend. This was on thursday. By friday we were purchasing maps, filling out campfire permits, and planning our route. We settled on a trip into the small Caribou Wilderness through Lassen National Park. Saturday morning we were up packing and hit the road. By 2pm we were leaving the car and on the trail. Lassen Park is littered with unique and varied terrain from the volcanic activity that has occurred there relatively recently. We walked past large "hills" of lava flows that had now hardened into black rock. We were only passing through this waist land, headed for the small wilderness area east of Lassen Park known as the Caribou Wilderness. We were initially intrigued by this area on a 7.5 minute topo map by the vast amount of small lakes scattered throughout. Without taking the time to do some research we concluded that this must be some sort of wetland. We were surprised to find out that this was far from the truth. It turns out that these small bodies of water were only "trapped" ponds surrounded by forest. Often the surrounding trees would be growing in the water itself. We concluded that their must be a hard layer of rock beneath preventing the water from soaking in. 

Our final destination was the large and blue Triangle Lake. It was nothing special in terms of lakes, except when all you see is small brown lake after small brown lake for hours. It was at this lake that I was reminded: It's all about the light. Photographing that evening was decent but nothing spectacular. After shooting an all night timelapse of the stars (http://www.davidfrandsenphoto.com/photography-blog/2012/6/12/night-sky.html) I woke up to beautiful light and a layer of fog accross the lake. This made for great shooting conditions that I didn't think would come from the night before. Below is my favorite shot from the trip.